Anaphylaxis Treatment

This page is for learning what to do in an emergency in the future.

IF ANAPHYLAXIS IS HAPPENING NOW ADMINISTER ADRENALINE AUTO- INJECTOR IMMEDIATELY AND PHONE 999 IF YOU HAVE NO ADRENALINE AUTO- INJECTOR DIAL 999 IMMEDIATELY.

Check for signs To prevent potential life threatening or serious complications, and better chance of improvement, anaphylaxis treatment must be administered as soon as possible.

ACTION FOR ANAPHYLAXIS

Stop eating or drinking the product that is causing you to have a reaction.

USE ADRENALINE AUTO-INJECTOR IF ANAPHYLAXIS SYMPTOMS PRESENT, INJECT IN UPPER OUTER SIDE OF THIGH IMMEDIATELY (DO NOT WAIT FOR MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL TO ARRIVE)

Adult

  1. Pull off the safety cap or needle covering.
  2. Inject the adrenaline into the outer thigh; do no inject in the buttocks area (Injecting into the outer thigh makes it extremely unlikely to damage to nerves and tendons, or that it will accidentally be injected into an artery or vein). The needle is designed to go through clothing, if necessary, avoid seams buckles and zips.
  3. Once injected, follow the device’s instructions for how long to keep it in place — usually 10 seconds or until all the adrenaline is delivered. Make sure the person who is having a reaction is laying down on their backs, if breathing difficulties sitting up, or if pregnant laid on their left side.
  4. Remove the device and keep the AAI to give to the ambulance crew.
  5. Call 999 immediately. Tell the emergency call handler you just used adrenaline to treat an anaphylactic reaction.
  6. Make sure the allergen is nowhere near the adult, if necessary, remove food from mouth.
  7. If a second dose of adrenaline is required use opposite thigh to the 1st administered thigh.

Child

Extra things to think of, use this in conjunction with adult instructions.

  1. Make sure the child is sitting up.
  2. If the child has a Ventolin inhaler administer the right amount checking with their action plan
  3. Be very calm, and supportive to the child.
  4. Use language the child can understand.
  5. Make sure the allergen is nowhere near the child, or the child has stop eating the item, if necessary, remove food from mouth.
  6. If a second dose of adrenaline is required use opposite thigh to the 1st administered thigh.

Note time of Adrenaline auto-injector given, if no improvement then a second can be given 5 -15 minutes after the first pen administered.

If a second dose of adrenaline is required use opposite thigh to the 1st administered thigh

Please note antihistamines cannot be relied on for anaphylaxis even if symptoms are very mild as these can take up to 30 minutes to be present in blood system and full affect can be up to 3 hours.

If possible, find out the persons details and what they have had to cause an allergic reaction as this will help the paramedics. If you have someone with you get them to look out for ambulance so can direct to the patient. If the ambulance has not arrived re phone to see if the ambulance is on its way.

Please note not all symptoms can be present and some people will react differently, always seek medical attention.

Not All Reactions Are The Same!
Past reactions do not predict future reactions!

These links are provided by other sources and British Food Allergy Awareness is not responsible for content or the updated information reliability.

NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/anaphylaxis/

Some medications e.g., beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (NSAIDs)
e.g., ibuprofen, may interfere with the action of adrenaline auto-injector and worsen the allergic reaction.

When you are given your adrenaline auto-injector speak to your GP or consultant about medications you are on, and medicines that could affect the efficiency of the AAI.

How to do CPR during COVID-19

Resuscitation Council UK and Vimeo

Hands-only CPR

To carry out a chest compression:

  1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first-hand and interlock your fingers.
  2. Position yourself with your shoulders above your hands.
  3. Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5 to 6cm (2 to 2.5 inches) on their chest.
  4. Keeping your hands on their chest, release the compression and allow the chest to return to its original position.
  5. Repeat these compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 times a minute until an ambulance arrives or you become exhausted.

When you call for an ambulance, telephone systems now exist that can give basic life-saving instructions, including advice about CPR.

These are now common and are easily accessible with mobile phones.

(Source Text NHS)

CPR with rescue breaths

If you have been trained in CPR, including rescue breaths, and feel confident using your skills, you should give chest compressions with rescue breaths.

If you’re not completely confident, attempt hands-only CPR instead.

Adults

  1. Place the heel of your hand on the centre of the person’s chest, then place the other hand on top and press down by 5 to 6cm (2 to 2.5 inches) at a steady rate of 100 to 120 compressions a minute.
  2. After every 30 chest compressions, give 2 rescue breaths.
  3. Tilt the casualty’s head gently and lift the chin up with 2 fingers. Pinch the person’s nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth for about 1 second. Check that their chest rises. Give 2 rescue breaths.
  4. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover, or emergency help arrives.

Children over 1 year old

  1. Open the child’s airway by placing 1 hand on their forehead and gently tilting their head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.
  2. Pinch their nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth, and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give 5 initial rescue breaths.
  3. Place the heel of 1 hand on the centre of their chest and push down by 5cm (about 2 inches), which is approximately one-third of the chest diameter. The quality (depth) of chest compressions is very important. Use 2 hands if you can’t achieve a depth of 5cm using 1 hand.
  4. After every 30 chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 a minute, give 2 breaths.
  5. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover, or emergency help arrives.

Infants under 1 year old

  1. Open the infant’s airway by placing 1 hand on their forehead and gently tilting the head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.
  2. Place your mouth over the mouth and nose of the infant and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give 5 initial rescue breaths.
  3. Place 2 fingers in the middle of the chest and push down by 4cm (about 1.5 inches), which is approximately one-third of the chest diameter. The quality (depth) of chest compressions is very important. Use the heel of 1 hand if you can’t achieve a depth of 4cm using the tips of 2 fingers.
  4. After 30 chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 a minute, give 2 rescue breaths.
  5. Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until they begin to recover, or emergency help arrives.

(Source Text NHS)

How to use a defibrillator St. John’s Ambulance

Common EpiPen side effects may include:

  • breathing problems,
  • fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeats,
  • pale skin, sweating.
  • nausea and vomiting.
  • dizziness.
  • weakness or tremors.
  • headache; or
  • feeling restless, fearful, nervous, anxious, or excited.

Undiagnosed

Sometime anaphylaxis may occur, and the person has not been diagnosed food allergies. If the person is unconscious and has no adrenaline auto-injector check for breathing, if breathing normally and put into the recovery position. Dial 999, keep an eye on breathing while waiting for emergency services to arrive. If the person has stopped breathing use CPR.

Adult recovery position St. John’s Ambulance

Child recovery position St. John’s Ambulance

Baby recovery position St. John’s Ambulance

More links

Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg134

RCUK Guidelines 2021 Published

https://www.resus.org.uk/about-us/news-and-events/rcuk-guidelines-2021-published?fbclid=IwAR2AhmCUP4eBs0eUViRz7FVBjNOVbEozzC-GDK3jDfWLux6qBNpbA_C4tbA

This information is only given as guidance and not extensive. Information to be used at individual’s responsibility. Always seek medical advice.

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