Nuts

Tree nuts are seeds and nuts that grow on trees, unlike peanuts which are grown underground. People can be allergic to tree nuts but not peanuts or they be allergic to both.

Tree nut allergy is stressful due severity of reaction and high cross contamination possibility.

This list is a guidance, included in this list is possible allergen, please check labels.

Lupin (or lupine)—which is becoming a common flour substitute in gluten-free food. A study showed a strong possibility of cross-reaction between nuts and this legume, unlike other legumes. Avoid Lupin as well until you speak to a medical professional.

Until you are tested avoid peanuts and lupin to be safe.

You may be allergic to traces of amount of the allergen, below are a few statements companies use to make you aware that the allergen is used onsite or on the same machinery. If your food allergy is severe, please look for the following statements on food labelling to avoid anaphylaxis by cross contamination. Also, be aware that companies do not have to put this statement on their labels by law, if you have a reaction to a product avoid using that food product in the future. It might be worth to contact the company if you have had a reaction, and there is no allergen or Precautionary Allergen Labelling. Contacting the company, they can check their safety onsite, or they find an ingredient has been put in error into the food product and put a food recall in place.

If you are uncertain about a product, contact the company to clarify before using the food product.

  • May contain.
  • Produced in a factory.
  • May contain X.
  • Not suitable for someone with X allergy

Foods from abroad has been included in this list, this is for guidance for the traveller.

If you would like food recall alerts directly sent to your email, please use the contact page you will be added to the next food recall alert. Please check the GDPR page, to see how your details are stored.

Drinks 
Nut distillates/alcoholic extracts
Nut milk (e.g., almond milk, cashew milk)
Flavoured coffee
Hot chocolate
Nut liqueurs (Frangelico, Amaretto, and Nocello)
Herbal teas
Specialty drinks
Nut flavoured alcoholic liqueurs and syrups
Foods 
African food 
Almond – Prunus dulcis (Rosaceae) 
Almond meal
Almond paste
Anacardium nuts
Artificial nuts
Asian food
Baked goods Cookies, candy, pastries, pie crusts, and others)
Baking mixes
Baklava
Beechnut – Fagus spp. (Fagaceae) [botanical name, beech nut]
Biscotti
Black walnut hull extract (flavouring)
Brazil nut – Bertholletia excelsa (Lecythidaceae)
Breakfast cereals
Bush nut
Butter chicken
Butternut 
Caponata
Cashew – Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae)
Chicken korma
Chili
Chinese Food
Chocolate some bar cross contamination or nuts present in
Cold cuts such as mortadella.
Cookies, biscuits
Crackers
Crisps
Doughnuts
Dukkah
Energy bars
Filbert/hazelnut
Flavouring (natural / artificial) 
Frozen desserts
Fudge
Gianduja (chocolate and chopped almonds and hazelnuts; other nuts can be used)
Grain breads
Granola
Hazelnut – Corylus spp. (Betulaceae) 
Health food bars
Heartnut
Hickory nut – Carya spp. (Juglandaceae)
Indian foods
Indian nut
Juglans cinerea (Juglandaceae)
Juglans spp. (Juglandaceae) [botanical name, Walnut, Butternut, Heartnut]
Karite (shea nut)
Lollies
Macadamia nut – Macadamia spp. (Proteaceae) Queensland nuts
Macaroons
Mandelonas (peanuts soaked in almond flavouring)
Marzipan/almond paste
Mashuga nuts Nougat
Mexican food
Mortadella
Muesli
Nangai nut
Natural nut extract (e.g., almond, walnut—although artificial extracts are generally safe)
Nougat
Nut butters (e.g., cashew butter)
Nut flours (almond flour is the most common)
Nut meat 
Nut oils (e.g., walnut oil, almond oil)
Nut paste (e.g., almond paste)
Nut pieces
Nutella ®
Pasta sauces
Pastries
Pecan- Carya illinoensis (Juglandaceae) mashuga nuts 
Pesto
Pies
Pili nut – Canarium ovatum Engl. in A. DC. (Burseraceae) 
Pistachio – Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) 
Popcorn
Praline
Shea nut – Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn. (Sapotaceae)
Snack mixes
Soups
Stuffing
Sundae toppings, 
Sweets
Takeaway/restaurant food
Thai food
Trail mix
Turkish delight
Turrón (typically made with almonds)
Vegetarian dishes
Veggie burgers
Vietnamese food 
Walnut (English, Persian, Black, Japanese, California)
Walnut hull extract (flavouring)
Condiments
Barbeque sauces 
Dips
Glazes, 
Gravy
Hot sauce
Marinades
Mole sauce 
Pesto
Salads and salad dressing
Smoke flavourings

This information is only given as guidance and not extensive. Information to be used at individual’s responsibility. Always read the label. Always seek medical advice.

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